Hurricane Harvey changed the landscape of many Gulf Coast communities, possibly forever. 66 people lost their lives, and the total damage estimate tops $125 billion. After Hurricane Katrina, it is the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history. At the storm’s peak, a third of Houston was underwater and39,000 people were forced from their homes into shelters. And though in many ways recovery has been remarkable, the pain and the scars still show. Texas Standard presents a special broadcast, looking back at how the Gulf Coast experienced and responded to the storm. During the next few weeks, we’re also focusing on where we are today. How have the communities that were hardest hit rebuilt, and what have we learned that could help us weather the next major storm?

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A Year After Opening Her Home To Harvey Victims, This Woman Says ‘Rockport Is Not OK’

People with no home of their own are still living in temporary quarters in Rockport.

Some Workers Who Helped Rebuild After Harvey Were Never Paid For Their Labor

“Only about 42 percent of cases that are investigated actually award out the wages that are claimed to have been not paid,”

An Unexpected Impact Of Harvey: Hundreds Of Damaged Clocks In For Repair

We take a look at how one shop is still repairing ‘Harvey clocks,’ nearly a year after the storm.

Despite Flooding From Harvey, An Endangered Bird Lives On Along The Texas Coast

The manager of the Attwater Prairie Chicken National Wildlife Refuge says the “captive breeding program has essentially saved this species.”

Harvey Damaged All Port Aransas Businesses. The Island Town Is Working Its Way Back.

The beach towns of Port Aransas and Aransas Pass are welcoming tourists again, but residents, businesspeople and infrastructure are still feeling the effects of the storm.

Rockport Bounces Back After Harvey, But Many People And Businesses Remain Displaced

“You know we have a very affluent community in some areas, …and then we have the ‘have nots,’ the service workers that live in our community that are struggling.”

In Brazoria County, Ranchers’ Biggest Post-Storm Battle Is Often A Fight Against Weeds

Thistles and other vegetation the storm blew onto coastal ranch lands are choking out the grass livestock need to survive.

A New School Year Is Both A Reminder And An Opportunity To Help Kids With Mental Health Needs

Some students aren’t attending the same schools they did last year, and those who are may have vivid memories of where they were at this time last year.

How Trust And A Good Samaritan Saved Two Lives During The Storm

“I just think that’s a pretty neat testament to the way people trust and take care of each other when we need to.”

To Rebuild Houston ‘You Have To Reimagine It’

“We’ve got to come up with new thinking to address the new norm, which is much larger storms than we’ve had in the past.”

Deadline For Harvey Insurance Claims Approaching

“If you are filing a flood claim with the National Flood Insurance Program, that deadline is one year from the date that the damage occurred.”

What The Storm Wrought

During that final week of August 2017, as rain continued to fall, and rescue efforts ramped up, Texans began taking stock of the storm that devastated the Gulf Coast. Texas Standard Host David Brown, and reporters from around the region told the stories of loss, uncertainty and rescue.

August 28, 2017

August 29, 2017

August 30, 2017 (broadcasting from Corpus Christi)

August 31, 2017 (broadcasting from Galveston)

September 1, 2017 (broadcasting from Beaumont)

More Hurricane Harvey Coverage

Web Design: Shelly Brisbin

Banner Design: David Freid

Photography: Martin Do Nascimento, Casey Cheek, Jill Ament, Michael Marks, Joey Palacios