City And State Officials Weigh The Costs Of Restoring The Alamo

“The surface is slowly crumbling. There’s pieces that are slowly chipping away or experiencing some fatigue or issues with how it’s attached to the building.”

By Louisa JonasMarch 6, 2017 7:55 am| , , , ,

From Texas Public Radio:

If the “Reimagine the Alamo” project were complete tomorrow, Alamo Street would be pedestrian only. It would be lower than it is now, so the Alamo chapel would stand tall, like it did 181 years ago. Instead of only spending 15 minutes there like most people do today, visitors might spend a whole day, taking in a new museum, visitor’s center, and expanded historic grounds.

Roberto Trevino is the councilman for District 1, which includes the Alamo. He’s chair of the Alamo Management committee which is working to restore the site. Trevino says that includes repairing the stone walls on the chapel which are decaying from wear because of time and water damage.

“The surface is slowly crumbling. There’s pieces that are slowly chipping away or experiencing some fatigue or issues with how it’s attached to the building,” he says.

Trevino says not protecting the Alamo would be a loss of historic value, and could affect tourism, too. He points out that tourism is one of the biggest revenue sources for the city of San Antonio.

“And the Alamo is the biggest tourist attraction in the state of Texas. Protecting that investment is important,” he says.

The Alamo Master Plan has a total price tag of about $300 million.  Planners hope to raise that from three places:  They’ve asked state lawmakers for $75 million in the next two-year budget;  The city has already committed $17 million and is asking San Antonio voters to approved another $21 million in the May bond election. Private donors would contribute the rest.

Diego Bernal is a state representative from San Antonio’s District 123. He says the Alamo is to be revered just like the Statue of Liberty, Gettysburg, or the 9-11 Memorial.

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