Texas Standard for May 30, 2024: Texas students could soon be taught Bible stories in public schools

Proponents of a new elementary school curriculum redesign depict the lessons as context for classical literature, while critics accuse the plans of smuggling Christian ideology into the classroom.

By Texas StandardMay 30, 2024 9:17 am,

Here are the stories on Texas Standard for Thursday, May 30, 2024:

Have Texas efforts at election transparency compromised ballot security?

Texas officials have passed legislation over the last few sessions to make elections more transparent. In fulfilling those demands, county elections administrators have also made information public that can make it easier to determine how specific people voted.

The choices voters make in the private voting booth can later be identified in some cases using public, legally available records, according to a review by Votebeat and The Texas Tribune. Reporter Natalia Contreras joins the show with more.

The death toll from mass shootings grows while pleas for gun reforms in Texas go unheard

Parents of the Uvalde school shooting victims and gun reform advocates tried and failed to get the state Legislature to raise the age to buy assault weapons.

KERA’s Caroline Love reports they plan to try again, but many question whether they can succeed in a state known for its loose gun laws.

Central Health has a big plan to expand care for Austinites. Here’s how it works.

Depending on where you live in Texas, you might pay taxes to or receive services from a local hospital district. Some of the biggest in the state are Harris Health System in Harris County and Parkland Health & Hospital System in Dallas County.

KUT’s Olivia Aldridge explores how it all works at Central Health in Travis County.

Xbox Game Pass is set to shake up the way people play

When the latest Call of Duty game drops later this year, gamers won’t have to shell out $70 to play on opening day. They’ll just need a $10 monthly subscription to Xbox Game Pass.

Tech expert Omar Gallaga joins the show with more on the shifting business of gaming.

The rise of tornado tourism

They’ve seen baseball-sized hail and been battered by winds so strong they could barely stand – and paid good money for it, too.

Much to the chagrin of the National Weather Service, thousands of people have been flocking to Texas and the Midwest to sample life at the center of a storm. USA Today reporter Elizabeth Weise joins the Standard with the story today.

The stakes aren’t as high as ‘Game of Thrones,’ but ‘Ren Faire’ follows this festival’s changing of the guard

Buzz is growing around a new docuseries coming this weekend to HBO. “Ren Faire” follows what happens when the man who has presided over the Texas Renaissance Festival for 50 years retires.

Texas Standard caught up with director Lance Oppenheim at South by Southwest, where “Ren Faire” premiered:

Students and staff say their final goodbyes to 13 San Antonio ISD schools

Schools impacted by San Antonio ISD’s “right-sizing” plan will close their doors for good today, on the final day of the school year.

Texas Public Radio’s Camille Phillips attended the grand finale ceremony for Dorie Miller Elementary on the near East Side.

Texas students could soon be taught Bible stories in public schools

A new elementary school curriculum redesign includes lessons on things like Leonardo da Vinci’s portrayal of The Last Supper and Martin Luther King Jr.’s references to the biblical Book of Daniel. Proponents depict the lessons as context for classical literature, while critics accuse the plans of smuggling Christian ideology into the classroom.

Linda Jacobson is a senior writer for The 74, a nonprofit news outlet covering U.S education. She joins us today.

All this, plus the Texas Newsroom’s state roundup and Wells Dunbar with the Talk of Texas.

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